GBSD

Supporting Voices

"The nuclear triad is the most important element of our national defense and we have to make sure that we’re always ready to respond to any threat,"

—General Hyten, commander of U.S. Strategic Command,
said during testimony before the Senate Armed Services Committee

Feb 26. 2019


Source: Link

"In this environment, it is not possible to delay modernization of our nuclear forces if we are to preserve a credible nuclear deterrent."

—Secretary of Defense James Mattis
Feb. 2018

Source: Link



Air Force Gen. Paul J. Selva, vice chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, speaks about bilateral negotiations with nuclear-threatening adversaries to de-escalate those threats during a House Armed Services Committee hearing.
Mar. 8, 2017

"To deter, you have to have a capability that provides the adversary a calculus that he looks at and decides that his options will fail. If the adversary has capabilities to operate from the sea, from the land [and] from the air, we have to be able to turn all those elements. That's how the triad was developed and that's how we need to go."

—Air Force Gen. John E. Hyten, commander of U.S. Strategic Command
Mar. 8, 2017

Source: Link

"The globe is not getting any safer, and I believe the nuclear enterprise supports all military operations and all courses of diplomacy on the planet. When I describe what the Air Force does for the nation, I start with a safe and reliable nuclear deterrent and work my way out from there."

—Gen. David L. Goldfein, Chief of Staff, U.S. Air Force
Feb. 14, 2017

Source: Link

"I’m one that believes that you actually need all three legs and we’ve got to modernize them. And we haven’t modernized. I brought a visual aid for you here. So I don’t know if anybody’s seen one of these in a while, but this is an eight-inch floppy disk, all right? We require these today in the missile fields, eight-inch floppy disks. It’s time to modernize."

—Gen. David L. Goldfein, Chief of Staff, U.S. Air Force
Jan. 18, 2017

Source: Link

"This is a critical moment for our ICBM force. Nuclear threats are increasing around the world, and our existing ICBMs will not last forever. The (ICBM) Coalition is making a strong case to support the modernization of the ICBM force today so that it can continue to protect us for decades to come."

—Senator John Hoeven (R-ND)
Dec. 14, 2016

Source: Link

"The fact is, most of our nuclear weapon delivery systems have already been extended decades beyond their original expected service lives. So it's not a choice between replacing these platforms or keeping, it's really a choice between replacing them or losing them. That would mean losing confidence in our ability to deter, which we can't afford in today's volatile security environment."

—Former Secretary of Defense Ash Carter
Sept. 26, 2016

Source: Link

“Making major changes to the nuclear modernization program and the nuclear policy framework on which it is founded would not only endanger U.S. national security, it would send a terrible signal to both our allies and our adversaries.”

—Rep. Mike Rogers (R-AL), Chairman of the Subcommittee on Strategic Forces
Jul. 13, 2016

Source: Link

"As we contend with the department's five strategic challenges, we recognize that successful execution of our defense strategy requires that we maintain credible nuclear and conventional capabilities. Our strategic nuclear deterrent remains effective, but it's aging and it requires modernization. Therefore, we're prioritizing investments needed for a safe, secure and effective nuclear deterrent."

—Gen. Joe Dunford, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff
Mar. 2016

Source: Link

"I just want to be clear. I don't have a part of the triad in a sense, but I can tell you that in my view, my professional military view, and I am a member of the Joint Chiefs of Staff—the nuclear triad has kept the peace since nuclear weapons were introduced and has sustained the test of time. That is not unimportant. And that system has deteriorated, Congressman. And it needs to be revamped. It is not even an Army system. It needs to be overhauled and brought back up to its level of readiness."

—Gen. Mark A. Milley, Chief of Staff, U.S. Army
Mar. 2016

Source: Link

"While we seek a world without nuclear weapons, we face the hard reality that Russia and China are rapidly modernizing their already-capable nuclear arsenals, and North Korea continues to develop nuclear weapons and the means to deliver them against the continental United States. A strong nuclear deterrent force will remain critical to our national security for the foreseeable future. This is the highest priority for the Department of Defense."

—Mr. Bob Work, Deputy Defense Secretary
Jun. 25, 2015

Source: Link